First Visit to Cape May

Sunday, September 21, 2003, Led by Mary and Bill

Photos by Bill Walker

50 Species at Cape May, NJ

Anatidae (Ducks, Geese, and Waterfowl)
Podicipedidae (Grebes)
Phalacrocoracidae (Cormorants and Shags)
Ardeidae (Herons, Egrets, and Bitterns)
Threskiornithidae (Ibises and Spoonbills)
Cathartidae (New World Vultures)
Pandionidae (Osprey)
Accipitridae (Hawks, Eagles, and Kites)
Rallidae (Rails, Gallinules, and Coots)
Scolopacidae (Sandpipers and Allies)
Laridae (Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers)
Royal Tern
The wings were very thin and deeply bent in flight. We made this diagnosis of several birds flying over the ocean after rejecting our familiar terns (such as Forester's) and consulting the official Cape May checklist
Columbidae (Pigeons and Doves)
Alcedinidae (Kingfishers)
Picidae (Woodpeckers)
Falconidae (Falcons and Caracaras)
Tyrannidae (Tyrant Flycatchers)
Vireonidae (Vireos)
Corvidae (Crows, Jays, and Magpies)
Paridae (Chickadees and Tits)
Carolina Chickadee
We definitely saw and heard a chickadee several times today. After having satisfied ourselves that it was a Black-capped Chickadee, we paid it little mind, unaware that the Cape May birdlist considers Carolina Chickadee to be the only one occuring with sufficient frequency to warrant a listing. So, that must be what we say. We will count it on the trip list, but not on the life list, not yet.
Troglodytidae (Wrens)
Mimidae (Mockingbirds and Thrashers)
Sturnidae (Starlings)
Parulidae (New World Warblers)
Cardinalidae (Cardinals and Allies)
Icteridae (Troupials and Allies)

50 Species at Cape May, NJ

Anatidae (Ducks, Geese, and Waterfowl)
Podicipedidae (Grebes)
Phalacrocoracidae (Cormorants and Shags)
Ardeidae (Herons, Egrets, and Bitterns)
Threskiornithidae (Ibises and Spoonbills)
Cathartidae (New World Vultures)
Pandionidae (Osprey)
Accipitridae (Hawks, Eagles, and Kites)
Rallidae (Rails, Gallinules, and Coots)
Scolopacidae (Sandpipers and Allies)
Laridae (Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers)
Royal Tern
The wings were very thin and deeply bent in flight. We made this diagnosis of several birds flying over the ocean after rejecting our familiar terns (such as Forester's) and consulting the official Cape May checklist
Columbidae (Pigeons and Doves)
Alcedinidae (Kingfishers)
Picidae (Woodpeckers)
Falconidae (Falcons and Caracaras)
Tyrannidae (Tyrant Flycatchers)
Vireonidae (Vireos)
Corvidae (Crows, Jays, and Magpies)
Paridae (Chickadees and Tits)
Carolina Chickadee
We definitely saw and heard a chickadee several times today. After having satisfied ourselves that it was a Black-capped Chickadee, we paid it little mind, unaware that the Cape May birdlist considers Carolina Chickadee to be the only one occuring with sufficient frequency to warrant a listing. So, that must be what we say. We will count it on the trip list, but not on the life list, not yet.
Troglodytidae (Wrens)
Mimidae (Mockingbirds and Thrashers)
Sturnidae (Starlings)
Parulidae (New World Warblers)
Cardinalidae (Cardinals and Allies)
Icteridae (Troupials and Allies)

50 Species at Cape May, NJ

Cape May
Carolina Chickadee
We definitely saw and heard a chickadee several times today. After having satisfied ourselves that it was a Black-capped Chickadee, we paid it little mind, unaware that the Cape May birdlist considers Carolina Chickadee to be the only one occuring with sufficient frequency to warrant a listing. So, that must be what we say. We will count it on the trip list, but not on the life list, not yet.
Royal Tern
The wings were very thin and deeply bent in flight. We made this diagnosis of several birds flying over the ocean after rejecting our familiar terns (such as Forester's) and consulting the official Cape May checklist

Trip Map